Out/Fit

Your outfit was outsourced. I found out.

Folks packed in a factory, many more than should fit, were making your outfit. Then a fire broke out, but they were locked in. Making your outfit they couldn’t get out. They died without saying, they died without even getting close to thinking, “I’d just die if she walked in wearing the same outfit.”

This is no less than an outrage.

And you, you’ve been outsmarted, outwitted, outfitted by the textile industry the detergent industry the washing machine industry the dry cleaning industry the clothes hanger industry the wardrobe industry the footwear industry the fashion industry the sportswear industry the industry insiders.

What’s gotten into you? Don’t get taken in by the ins and outs of inseams, insoles, innerwear and outerwear. Get out of those wasteful get-ups. Get out of debt. Don’t get locked in. Get independent… and get out of your clothes. Strip the “out” and just go “fit.”

What’s the outfit to wear if you want to fit in?
Don’t get psyched out. Just wear your skin.

2 thoughts on “Out/Fit

  1. Terry Gross interviewed Elizabeth Cline, author of Overdressed. http://www.npr.org/templates/rundowns/rundown.php?prgId=13&prgDate=05-02-2013Cline's message was that manufacturers and we externalize much of the cost our apparently very cheap (and disposable!)apparel to the environment and workers in other places.A nudist perspective on tragedies like the Bangaladesh building collapse sounds like an evil joke, but nudism was part of a movement of a century ago toward life reform. That movement included changes from corsets and celluloid collars to more comfortable dress. The life reform movement also included economic reforms, which 20th century wealth seemed to make redundant. The continued existence of poverty — within our economic system, not as remote as Bangaladesh seems — and the apparently stalled prospects of developed-world workers argue against life reform's being redundant.Specifically vis a vis clothing, the dominance of inexpensive and poorly made clothing (Cline and Gross used the phrase \”fast fashion\”) is a drag on your welfare and mine.Here's how it works: Currency is supposed to be an abstraction of actual wealth, with wealth being the materials and tools for assuring survival and quality of life. When we make products that are designed not to last, it amounts to wear and tear on real wealth. A resilient economy that is designed to last would produce few things that last, and things that may be easily repaired. Otherwise, somebody's converting natural capital into private income.Oh, yeah, and we ought to be able to extend our wardrobes' lives by going naked.

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  2. Tom, thanks for this excellent and detailed contextualization – definitely not intended as an evil joke but rather a wry little prose poem plea for awareness. Life reform movement!

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